United States
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40.4230003233
OpenCalais Metadata: Longitude: 
-98.7372244786
  • WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney agree on this much: The 2012 election is filled with political differences and voters will face a stark choice in policies.

    On issues ranging from the role of government in American society to foreign policy, the Democratic and Republican candidates for president offered vastly different visions for the country in their acceptance speeches. Each set up sharp contrasts with his opponent, setting the terms of debate for the fall.

    Where Obama and Romney stand — as drawn from their convention speeches.

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    LAST UPDATE : Dec 06, 2012, 2:30 PM EST
    Story
  • U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during her joint conference with Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012. Talks between Clinton and Chinese leaders Wednesday failed to narrow gaps on how to end the crisis in Syria and how to resolve Beijing's territorial disputes with its smaller neighbors over the South China Sea.

    "Even when we disagree — believe me we can talk very frankly now — we can explore the toughest issues without imperiling the whole relationship," Clinton said.

    LAST UPDATE : Dec 06, 2012, 11:30 AM EST
    Story

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