Myanmar
OpenCalais Metadata: Latitude: 
19.876064
OpenCalais Metadata: Longitude: 
96.0451826667
  • The opposition leader said the public needed an explanation of the violence at a mine in northwestern Myanmar that injured dozens, including Buddhist monks.

    Supporters of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi reach to touch her hand as she leaves after a public meeting close to Letpadaung mine in Monywa, northwestern Myanmar, Friday, Nov. 30, 2012.
    LAST UPDATE : Dec 13, 2012, 8:00 PM EST
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  • In this photo taken on Nov. 10, 2012, Muslim refugees walk as Myanmar police officers stand guard at Sin Thet Maw relief camp in Pauktaw township, Rakhine state, western Myanmar. Myanmar’s government has launched a major operation aimed at verifying the citizenship of Muslims in western Rakhine state, the coastal territory that has been torn apart by Buddhist-Muslim violence since June. Questions over whether the region's Muslim Rohingya population qualify for citizenship are at the heart of a crisis that h

    Immigration authorities in western Myanmar have launched a major operation aimed at verifying the citizenship of Muslims living there.

    LAST UPDATE : Dec 13, 2012, 8:00 PM EST
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  • A young Buddhist monk watches protesters at a meeting during an occupy of the office entrance to the Chinese copper mine company Wan Bao Co. Ltd in Letpadaung mine, Monywa township, northwestern Myanmar, Wednesday, Nov 28, 2012.

    Dozens were hurt as security forces used water cannons and other devices to break up the rally before oppo leader Kyi could hear grievances.

    LAST UPDATE : Dec 13, 2012, 6:00 PM EST
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  • In this photo taken on Nov. 8, 2012, a Buddhist monk walks along ancient pagodas in Mrauk-U, Rakhine state, western Myanmar.

    A steady trickle of determined tourists are traveling to an area of Myanmar rocked by sectarian violence to ogle monuments of this region's glorious past.

    LAST UPDATE : Dec 13, 2012, 11:00 AM EST
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  • In this Nov. 19, 2012 file photo, U.S. President Barack Obama, left, meets with Myanmar's President Thein Sein at the Yangon Parliament building in Yangon, Myanmar.

    Concerns about corruption and political blowback at home will complicate efforts by U.S. companies to move in big and fast.

    LAST UPDATE : Dec 13, 2012, 7:30 AM EST
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  • In this Nov. 19, 2012, photo, President Barack Obama "douses eleven flames" as he tours the Shwedagon Pagoda with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton in Yangon, Myanmar.

    President Thein Sein's agreement to allow more scrutiny by U.N. inspectors suggests a willingness to go beyond reforms that have improved relations with Washington.

    LAST UPDATE : Dec 13, 2012, 5:30 AM EST
    Story
  • YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Officially at least, America still calls this Southeast Asian nation Burma, the favored appellation of dissidents and pro-democracy activists who opposed the former military junta's move to summarily change its name 23 years ago.

    President Barack Obama used that name during his historic visit Monday, but he also called Burma what the government and many other people have been calling it for years: Myanmar.

    That single word was noted and warmly welcomed by top government officials here, who immediately imbued it with significance.

    LAST UPDATE : Dec 13, 2012, 1:00 AM EST
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  • Myanmar has set free dozens of political prisoners around the country in an amnesty that coincides with the historic visit of President Barack Obama.

    LAST UPDATE : Dec 13, 2012, 1:00 AM EST
    Story

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