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Study says plants’ roots use sound to find water

May 19, 2017, 6:34 AM EDT
(Source: Kirt Edblom/flickr)
(Source: Kirt Edblom/flickr)

According to a new study at the University of Western Australia’s Center for Evolutionary Biology, plants’ root systems listen to acoustic vibrations produced by a water source and then travel towards it to survive and grow.

A series of experiments showed that the plants not only “feel” the sound of water but can distinguish between real and recorded vibrations, writes Quartz.

Besides, when the plant picked signals from two sources of water, such as underground water in soil and streams in pipes, the roots preferred to grow towards the natural source, which reflects their ability to make behavioral decisions.

Biologist Michael Schoner from the University of Greifswald in Germany believes that plants may even reflect animal sounds to communicate with them, notes Huffington Post.

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